Category Archives: Year of Gratitude

147 to 165 Days of Gratitude – Black Hawk Anniversary


Day 147 to 165 of 365 Days of Gratitude – Black Hawk Anniversary

It’s been 18 days since I last gave gratitude on this blog. I’ve been grateful for many things in those 18 days and most of them deal with my health and being alive. We should have gratitude for every day we wake and live on our beautiful planet Earth. Lots of people have come and gone since I’ve lived, and I ponder why some left this journey early, while others (such as my nana who lived till 94) stay longer than, perhaps, they would have liked. And, mostly why do some die so young?

Sunrise at Currumbin Beach Qld.

Have gratitude when you can wake each morning and see a new sunrise.

I am melancholy about this, as during these days the anniversary of The Black Hawk Accident occurred. 18 of our finest men died in that tragic incident June 12th 1996. 15 were SAS soldiers and one of them was Corporal Brett Tombs, a dear school friend. Many Australians will remember when the two Black Hawks collided over Townsville and how we mourned as a nation when we heard of the tragedy.

I think of Brett and his family each year and wish he could still be here with Gaye (who I also went to school with) and their two children, watching them grow up. It’s one of those things that, even twenty years later, you still don’t quiet believe that it happened. It resonates with me further because two of my sons have been in the defence force (one did three tours of duty). The Black Hawk incident shows that even in peacetime, there is always danger of some kind protecting our country. RIP Brett Tombs and all the young men of The Black Hawk.

You can read this tear-jerking account from last year’s Courier Mail, featuring Brett’s daughter Giverny. Brett would have been so proud of her and his son, Josh. I am grateful for something through that, and that is that his children have wonderful uncles (Brett’s brothers) who love his children and do their utmost to fill some of Brett’s void for them. It’s poignant and bittersweet.

So, for these 18 days of gratitude, let’s just say I’m truly grateful that all my family are safe and that we are here.

Reflect on what you were doing on the day of The Black Hawk Accident 21 years ago.

Lest we forget.

What does it feel like to hold your own book in your hands?


What does it feel like to hold your own book in your hands?

Donna Munro author of The Zanzibar Moon

I can finally answer that question. The answer is awesome, proud, excited, emotional, overwhelmed, happy, satisfied and grateful. I could probably add a dozen more emotions but I’m sure you get that it’s a special time for me. The boxes arrived Tuesday afternoon. My husband, Bevil, rang to say they had arrived and I warned him not to open them for a peek. I wanted to be the first to see my paperback version of The Zanzibar Moon. It was hard staying at work till knock-off time because I was anxious to see my books. When I got home I opened the smallest box. As soon as I saw the book at the top I knew they were even better than I had expected. The colours were vibrant and the cover did the story justice. I picked one up and stroked it. Wow, the matte cover has the velvet feel. It was perfect. I checked the blurb, the spine, the pages trimmed perfectly, the paper the cream I had chosen. Yes, yes, yes – it’s better than I imagined. There’s nothing I would change.

That’s when I did the happy dance and my son, Blake walked in and asked if I liked them. It was pretty obvious that I did (you know the weird happy dance, screams of delight and all). Then I asked Bevil to read the dedication. He was pretty chuffed with that and the look on his face made me burst into tears. He gave me a hug, then Blake realised I was crying and gave me a hug too. I was rather emotional but they were true happy tears. It’s a lifetime accomplishment of a lifelong dream. I was grateful that I had the ability to produce The Zanzibar Moon and for the support of my family and friends to have that moment of pure joy.

I confess that I still have a book with me everywhere I go. I had to buy a bigger bag to carry one. I stroke the cover regularly and keep staring at it. It’s really here. I have my book. The Zanzibar Moon is born and just like one of my children I fell in love at first sight. It’s now day three and there is this pure bubble of happiness inside me and I’m going to never pop that bubble.

Buy The Zanzibar Moon at the Bookstore or call into Petries Cottage Currumbin and say hello to the wonderful staff who have kindly offered to stock my book.

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