Posted in Animals and conservation, Travel

Beauty can disappear in an instant


If you saw my last post you’ll be waiting for the answer. If you guessed – View from Burleigh Heads National Park across Tallebudgera Creek. The locals call the beach Echo Beach. Sadly, since taking that photo a wildfire blazed through the national park. The scenic walkways are now temporarily closed so Parks and Wildlife can asses the fire damage. It’s sad to think of the wildlife in the park who could have been hurt, or their habitat destroyed. The bush turkeys who busily build their messy nests, the bearded dragons sunning themselves on rocks, the snakes and the birdlife. The park is a refuge for migrating birds. Where will they nest and feed now?

Echo Beach facing Tallebudgera Beach School and Palm Beach behind.
Echo Beach facing Tallebudgera Beach School and Palm Beach behind.

I just hope the local whispers are incorrect and that the fire wasn’t deliberately lit. After this morning’s boot camp I drove to Burleigh Headland but the fire must have been further around the outcrop and I couldn’t see the damage. I’d like to show you how beautiful the area was and will be again soon. My friend, Leesa and I were lucky enough to walk the bottom track last weekend. The whole walk we kept saying how lucky we are to live here. Leesa has travelled widely but she was gobsmacked at how awesome the Burleigh Heads National Park is. It’s also a very special place for the traditional owners the Aboriginals. You can visit Jellurgal Aboriginal and Cultural Centre at the roadside of the national park to find out more.

Bottom walking track towards Tallebudgera Creek entrance.
Bottom walking track towards Tallebudgera Creek entrance.
Look at the lushness and colour facing the water fro the track.
Look at the lushness and colour facing the water fro the track.
Pandanus at Burleigh Head under Tumgun Lookout.
Pandanus at Burleigh Head under Tumgun Lookout.
View to Coolangatta from The Cove.
View to Coolangatta from The Cove.
Minor Bird Karen Birthday 14 047
Towards the end of the track facing Surfers Paradise.
Spectacular colour in every aspect of the view.
Spectacular colour in every aspect of the view.

Thank you to my friend, Leesa for a wonderful walk and the opportunity to take these photos. I don’t think there’s a more scenic place to walk on the Gold Coast, though I also love Greenmount, especially when the whales are migrating. Others would also argue that the hinterland has some fabulous walks. But for us, Leesa, this place is very magical. I hope your arm heals quickly. She had an accident on her moped and badly broke her arm and received a nasty gash on her head. Best wishes beautiful friend.

 

Posted in Animals and conservation, Family life

Our Cranky Bird – another family member?


Most weekends we do our leisurely paper read and then I’ll take Mahli for a run.If the weather is nice, try to get outside with a book for an hour or so. We also barbecue often, so our backyard is a special place. Suddenly, the serenity has disappeared.

The Noisy Miner Bird we've named Cranky because he makes angry noises when he swoops us, but never connects.
The Noisy Miner Bird we’ve named Cranky because he makes angry noises when he swoops us, but never connects.

Cranky Bird has taken up residence. Well not exactly. We don’t know where this cheeky Miner Bird actually nests but he visits our yard often. It might be a spring thing. It started with him making his weird noises on the tree near the clothes line and occasionally swooping Mahli. Mahli would look up bemused and then chase the bird to the fence or another tree but never go close to getting it.

The real name is Manorina melanocephala and it’s a honeyeater. It doesn’t seem really sweet, rather sour. This is a cheeky little bird that seems to watch us all the time. Saturday I watched it swoop Mahli before it went for my head, as I read a book on my sun lounge. Cranky doesn’t peck us he just swoops with a little clicking noise and a great speed. He misses by THAT much!

Maybe he’s just playing and I think he’s harmless but I am curious as to why he does it so regularly. Aparently these birds have a territory and maybe he thinks we invaded his instead of the other way around. We do have a beautiful tree a tibouchina, with pretty purple flowers and possibly a nice nectare for a honeyeater bird. Maybe this tree has been marked in his territory.

The Noisy Miner Bird is said to be aggressive and we’ve seen Cranky chase off poor little Lorrikeetes but I think he’s only warning us because he never connects. Maybe because we talk to him he finds it as somewhat a game. I just hope Cranky never gets too close to Mahli’s teeth, or that spunky little bird really will be cranky.

I decided to set up my camera to video Cranky’s behaviour. You’ll get a laugh out of his antics as he swoops, Mahli, then me and Blake.